Tag Archives: Scott Graham

Things I Know To Be True

reviewed at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester on 17 October

Plays usually depend on what is said and the actions natural to the dialogue. Frantic Assembly do things slightly differently. Words, yes, and intelligent, character-credible ones at that by Andrew Bovell – but also a species of physical version of onomatopoeia from co-directors Scott Graham and Geordie Brookman.

This takes the form of part-mime, part-dance where the three women in the story – mother Fran, elder daughter Pip and younger afterthought Rosie – are lifted and swirled around the stage by their menfolk, partly in control and partly passive. It all takes place on a stage with minimalist furnishings (Geoff Cobham).

Kirsty Oswald as Rosie opens the drama with a monologue explaining that her gap-year travels culminated in a romantic encounter in Berlin which has left her disillusioned and robbed.

Then we meet her over-protective parents, Fran (Cate Hamer) who works in a hospital and father Bob (John McArdle) who has retired from an assembly-line job and now tends his garden while worrying about his children.

Pip (Seline Hizli) has come to the end of her marriage. Ben (Arthur Wilson) is a salesman on the way up, and on the make. Mark (Matthew Barker) is uncomfortable in his skin, as he reveals to devastating effect on his family in the second act.

Bovell’s script is a realistic and adult one, which managed to lure a predominantly teenaged audience into complete involvement with his characters’ difficulties; perhaps there’s something of Pip, Rosie, Ben and Mark in most of us, however submerged.

It’s acted with immense conviction, which in turn communicates itself across the auditorium. So that Rosie’s painful experience of growing-up contrasts with Pip’s determination to grow into her own person, not just the roles of wife and mother.

Fran’s increasing desperation to keep her brood together and happy within her own context in turn holds the reverse side of the mirror to Bob’s ultimately futile attempts to protect his daughters and maintain his sons on what he sees as a normal, honest path. These make up the drama and its inherent heartbreak which we can all recognise.

Four and a half star rating.

Things I Know To Be True runs at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester until 21 October with matinées on 19 and 21 October.

 

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Filed under Circus and physical theatre, Plays, Reviews 2017

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

reviewed at the Cliffs Pavilion, Southend on 18 July

Mark Haddon’s book about a teenage boy with Asperger Syndrome has been adapted for the stage by Simon Stephens. The National Theatre production by Marianne Elliott is currently on the second leg of its UK tour. Elliott may be the director, but Bunny Christie’s graph-paper design concentrated on a cube, Paule Constable’s complex lighting plot and Finn Ross’ video certainly don’t take second billing.

It’s not a comfortable story. Christopher Boone (Scott Reid), caught in a neighbour’s garden with the pitchforked body of her dog, is a central character with whom at first we struggle to find any degree of empathy, just as his parents and those around him do. If you’ve ever had anything to do with a friend or family member with autism, you will find yourself in familiar territory.

Reid’s portrait of a brilliant, logical and gifted mathematical youth trapped in a world whose lack of sequential reasoning seems so incomprehensible to him is a searing one. Siobhan (Lucianne McEvoy), one of his teachers,  comes closest to understanding his wavelength; McEvoy’s study of a woman who tries to comprehend – and to accept – is equally fine.

The other three main characters are Mrs Alexander (Debra Michaels), an elderly neighbour  who doesn’t condemn Chris out-of-hand, his uncomprehending father Ed (David Michaels) and Judy (Emma Beattie), the mother he was told had died but in fact who left her husband for a lover, Roger Shears. There is also a large ensemble.

Movement is an important part of this hypnotic production. Scott Graham and Steven Hoggett use the players in angular, often formal, groupings which echo Chris’ inner turmoil. This is a staging where what we hear – spoken dialogue apart – chimes in with the movement; Adrian Sutton’s score and Ian Dickinson’s sound design provides this. It’s akin to the incidental music familiar from films and, increasingly, television drams and documentaries.

What matters in the end is that it’s Christopher’s story, seen largely through his eyes and filtered through his off-kilter mental processes. Stand ing ovations are becoming a bit of a curtain-call cliché these days. The one for Reid (and, by inference, for the whole staging concept) was thoroughly merited.

Five star rating.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time runs at the Cliffs Pavilion, Southend until 22 July with matinées on 19 and 22 July.

 

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2017