Tag Archives: Pantomimes

Sleeping Beauty

reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Norwich on 15 December

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Filed under Family & children's shows, Music Music theatre & Opera, Pantomimes & Christmas season shows, Reviews 2017

Dick Whittington

reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds on 14 December

Chris Hannon’s script and the co-direction of Karen Simpson and David Whitney have really found the formula for a Theatre Royal pantomime. Their version of the story of Dick Whittington is replete with local touches which seem natural rather than afterthoughts and the whole show has a subtly period edge which suits this Georgian playhouse perfectly, including Julia Cave’s choreography.

We have a Principal Boy Dick (Jessica Spalis) who brings just the right teenage gawkiness to the part. Her trusty companion Tommy the cat is mimed by Corey Cross whose costume and acrobatics have elements of an hommage to Grimaldi; his excursions into the auditorium have the children competing to pet him.

Indeed a delicate whiff of Trelawny of the Wells imbues the entire production. The Fitzwarren emporium is a failing bookshop with bespectacled Alice (Tessa Kadler) as its liveliest item. Her father Francis (Nigel Lister) is ineffectual and in the shadow of his millionnaire expatriate brother Ferdnando. Winona Whittington arrives in London in search of her wayward son, rather than being the Fitzwarrens’ cook.

Chris Clarkson makes this Dame part into a real three-dimensional character, thus helping the often disparate elements of the pantomime to coalesce. Sparkly help is at hand in the shape of Sarah Lawn’s Fairy Pearl while Tom Roberts’ Sir Reginald Ratfiend twirls his tail as an alternative to moustaches with villainous effect and directs his troupe of ratlings to do their worst.

He’s the current Lord Mayor London, so has a double layer of power, and his appetite gnaws through books as well as foodstuffs. When he manages to shipwreck the Fitzwarren party however it is on Ferdnando’s paradise island (cue a u/v light sequence). Not even Nerine Skinner’s Nibbles, Ratfiend’s resourceful sidekick, can now alter the triumph of good over evil.

Dawn Allsopp is the designer for the deliberately quirky sets and costumes. The musical director is Ward Baker, tucked with Luke Petitt into a stage-left corner of the pit; a couple of toy theatre musician figures have been painted to the side of them. That’s just the sort of touch which gives this show the edge of some of its more lavish competitors.

Five star rating.

Dick Whittington continues at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds until 14 January. Performance dates and times vary, so check with the theatre’s website: www.theatreroyal.org for details and seat availability.

 

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Jack and the Beanstalk

reviewed at the Gordon Craig Theatre, Ipswich on 10 December

This Chris Jordan pantomime is a traditional one in many ways. There’s a Principal Boy as Jack (Lisa Mathieson) and a scene-stealing Dame Trott (Paul Laidlaw). The multi-named cow (Dulcie? Clarabelle? Daisy?) deserves a programme credit in her own right and the beanstalk is sufficiently spectacular.

Cliff Parisi’s Fleshcreep rather lets it all down. He doesn’t really convince as the villain – too prone to lollop on and off stage  and Melanie Masson’s Fairy Fuschiaa too easily dominates him. Mathieson makes an attractive hero who deserves to win Victoria Farley’s Princess Jill.

Of the two main comics, Laidlaw has the audience in the palm of his hand from first entrance, and Aidan O’Neill’s Simple Simon doesn’t take long to recruit us all in his gang. Siôn Tudor Owen plays King Custard and Matt Lee-Steer doubles the Town Crier and the ferocious, ravening Giant Blunderbore.

The choreography of Ashley Glazebrook and Glen Murphy (aka Twist and Pulse) at times taxes the female dancers of the ensemble, though the men have some eye-riveting leaps and turns to compensate. James Cleeve’s band is ensconced at audience level stage left and the standard of singing throughout is good; Laidlaw’s farewell to her cow stills the house.

Three and a half-star rating.

Jack and the Beanstalk runs at the Gordon Craig Theatre until 28 January. Performance dates and times vary. Check with the theatre’s box office at :www.gordon-craig.co.uk for availability.

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Filed under Family & children's shows, Music Music theatre & Opera, Pantomimes & Christmas season shows, Reviews 2017

Aladdin

reviewed at the Towngate Theatre, Basildon on 8 December

Home-grown pantomimes have the edge on commercial ones. Thy are tailored for a local audiences and the smaller theatres which house them add a special intimacy. Take Aladdin, Brad Pitt’s Christmas season show for Simon Fielding (who directs and plays Wishee Washee) at the Towngate.

It provides a couple of interesting variations on the story. Forget Abanazar – instead, we meet Aunty Banazar, a slightly ambiguous person as to gender once s/he travels to China. Sophie Ladds doubles the character with the Slave of the Ring in the prologue.

Again, this often downtrodden  slave isn’t what you expect. Rather she’s a single mother with a gob full of Estuary English and, like many another woman in her situation, she has perfected the art of delegation. She never answers her mistress’ summons but send her brood of children, the Ringlets, in her place.

Marianna Neofitou’s Princess Jasmin is a bright young lady, running circles around her father the Emperor (Nigel Peever). Under Matthew Reeves’ musical direction, the songs come over very well. Sam Ebenezer makes a likeable hero, though it might have been better if the script had made him Wishee’s younger (not elder) brother.

Widow Twankey is in the safe hands of Daniel Stockton, a Dame with attitude as well as a way with the audience. Visually, the ostumes lookgood and so does the well-varied choreography of Aisling Duffy and Ebony Clarke. Dominating the dance sequences from the Cave f Wonders scene onwards is Wade Lewin’s energetic Slave of the Lamp.

Flying by Foy does the magic carpet sequences proud; even the most cynical youngster in the audience didn’t fail to have been impressed, as Aladdin’s journey took him high into the auditorium over our heads.

Four and a half-star rating.

Aladdin runs at the Towngate Theatre, Basildon until 2 January. Performance dates and times vary, so check the theatre’s website www.towngatetheatre.co.uk for availability.

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Filed under Family & children's shows, Music Music theatre & Opera, Pantomimes & Christmas season shows, Reviews 2017

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

reviewed at the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford on 2 December

One From The Heart has been the Civic Theatre’s pantomime partner for a number of years and always produces a traditional show. This year it’s the Grimm story of Snow White with the dwarfs who come to her aid in the forest played by extremely well-rehearsed members of the juvenile chorus.

Where Simon Aylin’s script and Kerris Peeling’s direction diverge from the usual story is by making the Man in the Mirror a major character. Louie Westwood plays him as a subtly camp pop-star, all silver lamé and high kicks, who has been enslaved by Queen Grizelda (Jenny-Ann Topham), a ferocious Brünnhilde-type swathed in black and crimson and topped with a bull-horned headdress.

Abigail Carter Simpson is a likeable heroine who deserves her prince (Dominic Sibanda), though she is a better singer than dancer. Comedy is in the hands of Andrew Fettes as Nurse Nelly – a Dame of the old school – and Dickie Wood as Muddles – an instant audience favourite. Chris Whittaker’s choreography is enjoyable to watch as performed by the eight ensemble chorus.

No designer is directly credited, but the settings are pleasantly fairy-tale bookish and the costumes, especially for the predominantly muted crimson and gold walk-down, look well. James Doughty is the musical director with the numbers arranged by Ben Kennedy.

Three and a half-star rating.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs runs at the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford until 7 January. Performance dates and times vary; check the theatre website www.chelmsford.gov.uk/theatres for availability.

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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

reviewed at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester on 1 December

Daniel Buckroyd’s pantomime for the 2017-18 Christmas season at the Mercury Theatre  manages to avoid all the Disneyfied traps which so often make stage versions of this story pallid film clones. He tells the legend straightforwardly enough, but there are sufficient plot tricks to keep the audience fully alert.

Visually it is sumptuous with court costumes of the late Middle Ages and the Dame (Antony Stuart-Hicks), her son Muddles (Dale Superville) and the small chorus in what might best be described as theatrical late 18th century. David Shields’ settings, like his costumes, are cleverly created to catch the eye, move effortlessly from one scene to another and – through the use of a central bridge over the orchestra pit – using the forestage to its best advantage.

The immortals are Ghemisola Ikumelo as the cuddly Fairy Blossom and Carli Norris as the most slinky of evil Enchantresses. Norris revels in the audience’s instant dislike of this insinuating creature and plays it for all it’s worth. The King, Snow White’s bereaved father (James Dinsmore) doesn’t stand a chance once she has taken his late wife’s place.

Megan Bancroft’s Snow White charms the audience from her first appearance and sings as well as acts very well. it is not a prince who awakens her once she has tasted the poisoned apple but Rupert (Alex Green), the bookish younger brother of Simon Pontin’s Lord Chamberlain.

The dwarves are human-sized rod puppets, a sort of EU/UK nationality mix, and very well manipulated. Comedy is safe in the hands of Stuart-Hicks and Superville; the former’s deceptively dainty even when working the audience and the latter is a theatre favourite, for very good reason. The mirror scene where Nurse and Muddles alternate as the new Queen’s reflexion is hilarious – and not just for the quick changes required of them.

Richard Reeday s the musical director, letting the pleasant if not memorable score make its own impact, often involving Charlie Morgan’s choreography. Those forest animals – field mice, squirrels and hares –which come to Snow White’s aid once she is left in the woods are particularly well handled. The associate puppetry director is Abigail Bing.

Five star rating.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs runs at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester until 14 January. Performance dates and times vary. Check with the theatre website www.mercurytheatre.co.uk for availability.

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Filed under Family & children's shows, Music Music theatre & Opera, Pantomimes & Christmas season shows, Reviews 2017

Red Riding Hood

reviewed at the New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich on 28 November

This yea’s pantomime season kicks off for East Anglia in Ipswich with a new Peter Rowe rock’n’roll show. So far, so familiar. However, over the past few years Rowe has begun using stories which – though familiar one – are not usually thought of as part of the traditional; pantomime canon.

So the Arthurian The Sword in the Stone and last year’s Sinbad the Sailor are now succeeded by Red Riding Hood, no longer a little girl but a feisty teenager called Maisy Merry (Lucy Wells). Familiar elements are there – a contrasted pair of immortals to set the plot spinning, a hissable double villain(Rob Falconer), his thoroughly incompetent henchmen Adam Longstaff and Daniel Carter Hope), a dashing prince in search of true love (Max Runham) and the Dame (Simon Nock).

This being the New Wolsey Theatre, the score by musical director Ben Goddard is packed full of rock’n’roll numbers. The mischievous puppet animals by Entify which are audience favourites make more appearance this year; Prince Florizel has a whole farmyard as well as a fox and a squirrel as his Privy Council. Barney George’s set is deceptively simple with clever use of gauzes and sliding flats as well as grave-traps and a central mobile platform.

All the cast take turns as instrumentalists behind one of these gauzes which shrouds the back half of the stage. Most of the action takes place on the forestage – when it doesn’t spill out into the auditorium. Elizabeth Rowe’s spring fairy Cherry Blossom contrasts well with James Haggie’s icicle-fingered Jack Frost and Red Riding Hood has Little Miss Moffet and Goldilocks (Lana Walker) and Bo Peep (Isobel Bates) to support her.

Singing honours go to Falconer when the dastardly Sir Jasper metamorphoses into his werewolf alter-ego. Nock is of the school of slightly raucous Dames with a distinctly masculine edge. Haggie doubles as the Prince’s aide, rewarded by his choice of village maidens by the end. Wells and Runham make a thoroughly engaging central couple; Rowe allows them much more personality than is sometimes the case with more traditional pantomime scripts.

Four star rating.

Red Riding Hood runs at the New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich until 27 January. Performance dates and times vary. Check with the theatre’s website www.wolseytheatre.co.uk for availability.

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Filed under Family & children's shows, Music Music theatre & Opera, Pantomimes & Christmas season shows, Reviews 2017

Cinderella

(reviewed at the Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch on 5 December)

 

This is probably the favourite pantomime story, which raises high empectations in its audiences. The magic trick is to blend the familiar, much-loved rags-to-riches story with enough variations to spice it up while never smothering its essence. Andrew Pollard’s script in Martin Berry’s production manages to achieve just that balance.

The Queen’s Theatre tradition of using actor-musicians comes into its own – Natasha Lewis’ Cinderella must be the only trombone-playing one  in this year’s national crop. Jonathan Charles’ Dandini is a wandering fiddle-player, taken on by Jamie Noar’s Prince Charming, desperately trying to disentangle himself from his father’s plans for his future.

No Baron Hardup in this version. Rather, we have his spiteful widow (Georgina Field) keeping her two chip-off-the-matriachal-block daughters Miley (Simon Pontin) and Kylie (Carl Patrick) very much under her sharp-nailed thumb. No wonder the household is reduced to a single servant, Buttons (Alex Tomkins), who only stays because of Cinderella.

Mark Walters has designed a deceptively sumptuous set and costumes in a vaguely late 18th century style. Joshua Good man is the hard-working musical director, joined in the pit by Al Twist and Sarah Workman, and the on-stage cast. Field has a commanding way with a saxaphone, even when Liz Marsh’s choeography keeps her feet fully employed.

That all-important wow! factor comes also from Etisyai Philip’s Fairy Godmother, who manipulates the whole story, including Cinderella’s swan-drawn carriage as she leaves for the ball. Sherry Coenen’s lighting adds to the magical impression. Highlights include a well-handled rejection scene for Buttons and Cinderella, to which both of them bring the right degree of sincerity.

Well-loved gag scenes also make their appearnace, including the endless stocking and false foot in the slipper trying-on episode, Cinderella being made totear up her coveted invitation to the ball (by her step-mother, rather than step-sisters here) and locking her in a chest (even less comfortable than the usual cellar) in the attempt to hide her from her questing prince.

Cinderella runs at the Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch until 14 January. Check the theatre’s website (queens-theatre.co.uk) for performance times.

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Filed under Pantomimes & other seasonal shows, Reviews 2016

Jack and the Beanstalk

(reviewed at the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford on 3 December)

It’s billed as “a giant of a pantomime” and this One From The Heart production measures up to that description. Simon Aylin’s script falls tidily on the ear and Kerris Peeling’s direction keeps the action fast moving. Damian Czarnecki’s choreography gives excellent opportunities to both the ensemble (from Laine Theatre Arts) and the local juvenile dancers.

Costumes are bright and the fary-tale book sets have the right suggestion of not-quite real. Ben Ellis Strathie makes a dashing Jack with David McKechnie’s Fleshcreep as a worthy opponent, eminently hissable. Neil Bromley’s Dame Trott is in the traditional mould, trying (and failing) to keep both Jack and his brother Silly Billy (Samuel Parker) under her thumb. Both quickly establish an excellent rapport with the audience,

Daisy the cow knows how to dance (has she perhaps been watching the Lipizzaners of the Spanish Riding School?) and uses her doe eyes and long, long lashes to good effect. Gabriela Gregorian is Jill, a princess who knows her own mind – not necessarily following her father (Stephen McGlynn)’s instructions. Trying the lead the forces of good is Katie Brennan as Fairy Nuff, not the brighest student at fairy school, but willing to persevere.

Jack and the Beanstalk runs at the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford until 2 January. Check the website (chelmsford.gov.uk/theatres) for performance times.

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Filed under Pantomimes & other seasonal shows, Reviews 2016