Tag Archives: Matthew Bourne

The Red Shoes
reviewed in Norwich on 21 February

Seeing the Powell-Pressburger film The Red Shoes for the first time (for me that was in 1949) is, as the programme notes for this Matthew Bourne danced adaptation emphasise, something of a defining mark for anyone with an interest in ballet as well as the cinema.

Bourne keeps to the film story but adds some subtle hommage to the choreography of, among others, Fokine (Les Sylphides), Massine (Beach) and Cranko (The Lady and the Fool) in the episodes featuring the ecclectic repertoire of the déraciné company run so autocratically by Lermontov (Sam Archer).

There are nice humorous touches, notably when the soon to be supplanted prima ballerina Irina (Michela Meazza) and her posturing partner Ivan (Liam Mower) monopolise an over-worked and under-staffed stage crew in order to ensure that their follow-spots for Les Sylphides are becomingly bright and accurate.

Such characterisations are neatly pointed by all the dancers. It’s great fun picking up the in-jokes, such as the Wilson and Keppel sand dance and the music-hall girls’ abundance of slightly moulting feathers – but you lose nothing if you just take it as it unfolds.

Archer radiates the certainties of a man who has no time to waste on anything which isn’t for the good of his company and even more importantly, his vision for how it should be. So he recruits struggling composer Julius Craster (Dominic North) but reacts violently when Craster and his latest protegée Victoria Page (Ashley Shaw) fall in love.

Emotion is the enemy of art, Archer maintains; which was basically Diaghilev’s reaction to Nijinsky’s doomed marriage to Romola de Pulszky. The irony is, of course, that Lermontov is strongly attracted to Victoria. Glen Graham’s ballet-master and character dancer Grischa can foresee disaster looming; his tempter in the actual Red Shoes ballet sequence plays out both sides of the scenario.

There’s great fluidity as well as style in Bourne’s choeography, both in the ensemble dances and the mre formal pas de deux. The settings by Lez Brotherston take us effortlessly from front of stage to back-stage, from the luxury of Monte Carlo and a Mayfair salon to East End music-hall and garret lodgings – and swirl us in between through a surreal world which is neither realistic stage set nor pure abstraction.

This is a show where the lighting matters; Paule Constable achieves this superbly. The story is multi-layered and the choreography and visuals mirror this in perfect synchrony. The pre-recorded score has been arranged by Terry Davies from the film and concert music of Bernard Herrmann. It’s an evening whee a story and how it’s told balance perfectly.

Four and a half-star rating.

The Red Shoes is at the Theatre Royal, Norwich until 25 February with matinées on 23 an 25 February. The national tour continues until 22 July, including Curve, Leicester between 16 and 20 May.

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Filed under Ballet dance & mime, Reviews 2017

Mary Poppins

(reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Norwich on 1 July)

it’s almost a case of anything which cinema and CGI can do, a really imaginative live stage production can do better. The new touring production of Mary Poppins may be based on the famous Disney film, but it oozes a very special kind of magic all of its own.

Some of this is definitely due to Zizi Strallen’s stunningly good performance in the title role – there’s a healthy dose of acidity as well as sweetness in her portrait – but Bob Crowley’s set and costume designs (adapted by Rosalind Coombes and Matt Kinley) – so deceptively simple yet so complex and intricate – also play their part.

Musical director Ian Townsend makes the orchestra a distinct balancing party, aided by some strong singing voices among the principals. Grainne Renihan as the bird woman with her balad-like “Feed the birds” and Penelope Woodman’s Miss Andrew dispensing “Brimstone and treacle” in double doses stand out here.

The two young Banks children on the opening night were Georgie Hill as Jane and Jabez Cheeseman as her brother Michael. Their parents – bank clerk George and reluctantly stay-at-home wife Winifred – are also well sung and acted by Milo Twomey and Rebecca Lock. Matt Lee is an engaging Bert, a factotum who, like Mary Poppins herself, is not quite of this world.

Yves Adang leads the exceptionally strong male dance and song chorus, making the most of Matthew Bourne’s choreography, notably in the park scenes where the statues come to life. Projections (Luke Halls) and some brilliant lighting and special effects by Natasha Katz and Simon Sherriff help to transport the audience into the story’s parallel worlds.

Early 20th century London is shown to be outwardly a sombre place, with black-suited clerks and businessmen drudging away in their offices while equally dark-clothed women exercise their pet dogs and push babies in their prams for their daily constitutionals.

The brilliance of the transformation into eye-blinking colour during the first park scene is the sort of effect which lingers in the memory (and imagination)just as much as the flying effects and the clever use of house levels. The standing ovation at the end of the Norwich first night was, for once, fully justified.

Mary Poppins runs at the Theatre Royal, Norwich until 30 July with matinées on 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28 and 30 July.

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Filed under Music & music theatre, Reviews 2016