Tag Archives: Jill Freud

September Tide

(reviewed at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh on 26 August)

Daphne du Maurier is a writer whose name fills theatres – as well as emptying bookshop shelves. September Tide is set in the uncertain period following the Second World War when young men were liable for National Service, alcohol and certain foodstuffs were in short supply if not still rationed and England was having to accustom itself to a world which might look backwards with nostalgia but could never be quite what it used to be.

We are in Cornwall where Stella, a widow with grown-up children but still immensely attractive and charismatic, is eagerly awaiting a visit from her newly-married, London-based daughter Cherry. Cherry is a free spirit – something which she may have inherited from her mother, if not from her late sailor father – and you could describe her relationship with her new painter husband Evan as semi-detached.

If you know anything about du Maurier’s own life story, including her near-obsession with Cornwall, you can detect autobiographical elements as this three-cornered drama unfolds. The revised script is by Mark Rayment and Phil Clark’s production located it firmly in its period with no attempt to whittle away the moral issues propounded or their solution. The resolution is perhaps for us in the 21st century an overly romantic one, but attitudes to many things have changed over the past 50 or 60 years.

Eliza McClelland makes an appealing heroine as Stella, matched by Chris Clarkson’s domineering Evan a man as selfish as only those who are certain of their own genius can be. Light relief is provided by Jill Freud as Mrs Tucket, the indispensable “help”, and to a lesser extent by Michael Shaw as Robert, who hopes that Stella will one day agree to marry him.

Then there’s Rosanna Miles as Cherry, so insouciant on the surface but actually as uncertain about what the future holds as her elders – not to mention her hard-drinking husband. Too many of her lines, which are vital to the plot, seem to be thrown away – but that could just be the Jubilee Hall acoustics. Her younger brother, home on sick-leave from the Navy with a broken foot, is played by Harry Emerson.

September Tide runs at the Summer Theatre, Southwold until 12 September.

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2015

Summer seaside theatre – preview 1

East Anglia boasts three well-established summer repertory seasons. First of the mark this year is Suffolk Summer Theatres, founded by Jill Freud and now managed by Peter Adshead. The season begins on 8 July at St Edmund’s Hall, Southwold with Alan Ayckbourn’s How the Other Half Loves. It runs until 18 July and transfers from 23 July to 1 August at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh.

it’s followed by a change of mood with the comedy thriller Anybody For Murder? by Brian Clemens and Dennis Spooner. That on between 20 July and 1 August in Southwold and from 4 to 8 August in Aldeburgh. Then it’s the turn of Ray Cooney’s fizzing farce Out of Order, at Southwold from 3 to 15 August and Aldeburgh between 18 and 22 August.

One of Suffolk Summer Theatre’s previous successes was the staging of The Titfield Thnderbolt by TEB Clarke, based on the class Ealing comedy film. it’s being revived at the Jubilee Hall between 10 and 15 August, then transfers to Southwold from 17 to 29 August.

The season ends with Daphne du Maurier’s September Tide, a family drama set on the Cornish coast which its author so loved. Once more this opens in Aldeburgh between 24 and 29 August before journeying up the coast to Southwold from 31 August until 12 September.

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Filed under Reviews 2015