Tag Archives: Clive Flint

Funny Money

reviewed at the Southwold Arts Centre on 30 July

We’ve probably all done it at some time, haven’t we?. Picked up someone else’s coat, umbrella or bag in mistake for one’s own. Much farce is rooted in some such trivial occurrence going horrendously wrong.

Ray Cooney’s classic Funny Money, first staged in 1994, takes this situation to its natural, thoroughly illogical conclusion. Henry Perkins (Darrell Brockis) arrives home for his birthday dinner with a briefcase, outwardly the same as the one he went to the office with that morning.

Only it’s not.

This one doesn’t contain a half-eaten sandwich and left-over paperwork. it has over a million pounds in used notes. Wife Jean (Harriett Hare) is bemused. Best friends Betty (Claire Jeater) and Vic Johnson (Michael Shaw) are bemused.

Add two very different detectives to the mix (Charlotte Peak as Slater and Lee Hunter as Davenport) – not to mention a taxi-cab driver (Clive Flint) and a much-compressed passer-by (Richard Blaine) – and misunderstandings whirl ever faster.

Andy Powrie’s production keeps the pace frenetic but with split-second timing where it matters (in farce timing is the key to success). Brockis has a superbly deadpan semi-gormless expression as events spiral completely out of Henry’s control.

Harassed beyond her comprehension, it’s no wonder that Hare’s Jean heads for the gin-bottle. Shaw and Jeater act as perfect foils as Peak’s upright policewoman (who needs a body to be identified) contrasts with Hunter’s easily-corrupted officer.

Flint has fun with Bill, popping in at regular intervals to remark that the fare-meter is running overtime and wondering just who (and how many) are going to Heathrow for the Barcelona flight (or will it be Adelaide?).

Four and a half-star rating.

Funny Money runs at the Southwold Arts Centre until 18 August. There are no Friday or Sunday performances but matinées on 31 July, 7 and 14 August and early evening performances on 2, 4, 9, 11. 16 and 18 July. It transfers to the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh between 21 August and 1 September. There are early evening performances on 23, 25, 30 August and 1 September.

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Body Language

reviewed at the Southwold Arts Centre on 11 July

Modern surgery is a miracle of science. But science can prove fallible and miracles display a flip side. Ayckbourn’s 1990 satirical comedy is set in one of those well-appointed and attractively-staffed clinics in the countryside which cater for the physical problems of the wealthy and famous.

The newest patient is model Angie Dell. Her money-eyed manager Ronnie Weston can’t wait for her to resume her lucrative career. Visiting the clinic is controversial East European surgeon Hravic Zyergefoovc with his prefered assistant Freya. The clinic’s director, and a former student of Hravic, is Benjamin Cooper.

Where the famous go, these days there follows the media. Radio journalist Jo Knapton wants a couple of interviews; not-quite-successful photographer Derek Short is after that killer glamour shot which should make both his reputation and his fortune. Fading pop star Mal Bennet wants his now-estranged Angie back.

That’s just the first scene. By the second and Act Two, Hravic has performed his miracle operation – with just one unfortunate consequence. Ron Aldridge’s direction keeps the action flowing as briskly as any scalpel and Tory Cobb’s two-level set allows that action free play.

The cast go to it with a will. Clive Flint has a field day with Hravic as does Richard Blaine with Mal. Neither Ronnie nor Derek are particularly nice characters, as Darrell Brockis and Lee Hunter make plain. Claire Jeater pulls out all the stops as Freya while Michael Shaw is suitably  suave as Benjamin.

But the centre of it all is the relationship between Angie and Jo. Charlotte Peak’s Angie has just the right combination of vulnerability and determination for someone faced with a flimsy and brief career which is basically run by other people.

As Jo, Harriett Hare radiates firstly the slightly bored attitude of someone dispatched on yet another routine assignment and later as a woman confronting very personal demons and daemons. Yes, it’s hilariously funny in parts. But it’s also something thought-provoking and slightly scary.

Four star rating.

Body Language runs at the Southwold Arts Centre until 21 July with matinées on 14, 17, 19 and 21 July (there is no performance on 20 July). It transfers to the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh for the week 24-28 July.

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The Prisoner of Zenda

reviewed at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh on 7 August

Anthony Hope added a new word to the English language in  1894 – Ruritania – with The Prisoner of Zenda. The romantic adventure novel  was quickly adapted for the stage by Edward Rose (cast of thousands) and has been filmed countless times (likewise).

Mark Sterling’s version keeps the multiple settings, from palace and cathedral to forest hunting-lodge and gloomy castle dungeon but manages it all with a cast of seven. Tory Cobb has thrown in one of Suffolk Summer Theatre’s specialities (a train sequence) for good measure. Miri Birch’s costumes work better for the women than for the men.

The story concerns the disputed monarchy of one of those turbulent Balkan states sandwiched between two fading but still powerful empires – the Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman – fiercely independent, proud of its traditions but wary of its neighbours. The about-to-be-crowned king is Rudolf V; his envious illegitimate half-brother Michael wants to take his place.

A proposed marriage between Rudolf and his cousin Flavia (who herself has a claim to the throne) is a further complication, as is Michael’s mistress Antoinette du Maubin. Then there’s Rudolf’s double, a folk-melody enthusiast from England, Rudolf Rassendyll. Not to mention Michael’s dashingly sinister wheeler-dealer factotum Rupert of Hentzau.

That hard-working cast take it all as seriously as it should do. Joe Leat’s double of the wine-addicted king and the English gentleman who takes his place at the behest of loyal Colonel Sapt and Fritz von Tarlenheim is very well contrasted, the one all sodden self-pity and the other reluctantly dashing.

Rick Savery is suitably sinister as Michael, though Saul Boyer didn’t (for me on the opening night) quite strike the right note for a man who takes such pleasure and pride in manipulating others. Clive Flint’s Sapt and Tom Slatter’s Fritz are stalwart in their military attempts to keep the monarchy in place, whatever their personal feelings about the incumbant.

In this version,  Amy Christina Murray as Princess Flavia has more to do than just be the decorative object of Rassendyll’s self-sacrificing love, an updating which works in the context. Sarah Ogley’s Antoinette is also more than her dark mirror image. Richard Blaine stages an excellent couple of sword fights, though the costume department could surely have provided sheathes for them when not in use.

Noisy scene changes will presumably quieten down and be slicker (too many glimpses of the people effecting them on the opening night) as the run and its transfers progress. One query – in the last meeting between restored king and his English saviour, why does Rasendyll have dark hair when he and the king have been much lighter throughout?

Four star rating.

The Prisoner of Zenda runs at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh until 12 August with matinées on 10 and 12 August. It transfers to the Southwold Arts Centre between 15 and 26 August and can also be seen at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds from 6 to 9 September.

 

 

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Murder Weapon

reviewed at the Southwold Arts Centre on 20 July

A weapon is usually something concrete. It can also be animal. Brain Clemens’ last thriller plays on this, with the story of a Paul (Clive Flint) found shot by his wife Diane (Amy Christina Murray) and her friend Jessica Bligh (Sarah Ogley), the county’s chief constable, as they return after a concert.

Under arrest is Charlie Mirren (Tom Slatter), found at the scene of the crime with a gun in his hand. An open-and-shut case, thinks Inspector Fremont (Rick Savery), especially as Mirren has recently been released from prison following conviction for the murder of his wife and children. No so, maintains Bligh, as she forces her colleague to re-evaluate the whole sequence of events and the people connected to them.

For instance, there’s psychiatrist Hugo (Joe Leat) who quickly establishes a rapport with Charlie on a scheduled visit to his consulting-rooms. The gun is obviously important, but what precisely was the context in which it was fired? The tension builds nicely in Andy Powrie’s production with the professional duel between Ogley and Savery well nuanced.

The set by Tory Cobb, brown with stained-glass window details, plays an important part in the action. Slatter’s portrait of a man struggling with his and his family’s past as well as his need for emotional support in his uncertain present and future is excellent. Leat has just the right combination of professional and personal arrogance.

Murray does suffer from the current fashion to whisper rather than enunciate. Modern theatre training and television have a lot to answer for in that respect Even small theatres when filled with an audience have a different acoustic to the same auditorium under rehearsal conditions.

Three and a half-star rating.

Murder Weapon runs at the Southwold Arts Centre as part of the Suffolk Summer Theatres season until 29 July with matinées on 20, 22, 27 and 29 July. It transfers to the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh between 1 and 5 August.

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The 39 Steps

(reviewed at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh on 9 August)

This new production for Suffolk Summer Theatres has been devised and directed by Mark Sterling from the Patrick Barlow tongue-in-cheek version of the John Buchan novel brought memorably to the screen by Alfred Hitchcock.

Though it may seem like a whole sequence of “based on…”, this staging does add a further dimension, with its introductory sequence from the film, multiple use of projections and some Hitcockian hommages – the music-hall is MacGuffin’s and the moorland chase has a pair of hobby-horse planes with their pilots plotting north by north-west courses.

The four main actors – Clive Flint, Joe Leat, Amy Christina Murray and Simon Stanhope – are supplemented by ASMs Kitty Dunham and Laurence Leonard who not only move the triangular pillars and furniture but join enthusiastically in the second act’s highland reel. They fully deserve their appearance at the curtain call.

Stanhope is our dashing hero Richard Hannay who, finding himself in London at a loose end, goes to the music-hall and thereby secures himself a perilously adventurous future. Murray whisks on and off a sequence of wigs and accents as the femme fatale whose appearance in Hannay’s flat triggers off the whole story, the feisty but not unflappable Pamela, the susceptible crofter’s wife and others.

“Others” sums up the multi-faceted Flint and Leat perfectly. Flint manages, with swift headgwear, coat and skirt changes, a positive galaxy of characters from Mr Memory and the crofter to railway officials, policemen, landladies and one of the duo of rain-coated, slouch-hatted, dark-glasses spies. Leat’s Professor Jordan provides a hilarious sub-Hitlerian tirade and one half of a Flanagen & Allen turn.

The 39 Steps continues at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh until 13 August, transfers to the Southwold Summer Theatre between 15 and 27 August and to the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds from 6 to 10 September.

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Murder By The Book

(reviewed at Suffolk Summer Theatres, Southwold on 19 July)

Writing is a solitary occupation; it can lead to depression and self-denigration. On the other hand, it has been known to develop into megalomania. The thriller by Duncan Greenwood and Robert King has as its central character a successful thriller writer whose lucrative part-time supplement to his earnings comes from writing vitriolic reviews of his competitors’ novels.

His secretary goes along with all this; his even-wealthier actress and somewhat libidinous wife has had enough. Divorce has been mentioned, but this has financial implications. It’s all a neat set-up for role-playing of many sorts, though Phil Clark’s fast-paced production never manages to make the characters anything other than pasteboard puppets.

Leyla Holley plays Imogen, a woman whose histrionics spill over from stage to drawing-room. Costume designer Miri Birch places us firmly in the Mary Quant/Biba era. Amy Christina Murray makes a pert Christine with Joe Leat as the exceptionally nosy next-door neighbour whose “Hurray Henry” façade is not quite what it seems.

Selwyn Piper, the concocter of mysteries at the centre of the drama, is Simon Stanhope with Clive Flint as his publisher John Douglas. They all take it as seriously as this sort of comedy-thriller requires, but – for me at any rate – it never quite jells. Perhaps you should blame the weather.

Murder by the Book runs at the Southwold Summer Theatre until 30 July and transfers to the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh between 2 and 6 August.

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Anybody For Murder?

(reviewed at the Suffolk Summer Theatre, Southwold on 20 July)

You know that a thriller with Brian Clemens and Dennis Spooner as its writers is going to offer audiences a clever and slick couple of hours entertainment. This comedy thriller is no exception; but you do need to concentrate to keep the tangles of the plot from knotting themselves inextricably in your brain.

The plot in question involves two couples, the girl-friend of one husband and a beached-up writer of murder mysteries. Max Harrington, by his own admission a second-rate research chemist, and his wife Janet have bought a farmhouse on a minute and very remote Greek island. If they ever thought to live “the good life” there, that dream has already crumbled into dust. Just like the farm’s soil.

Neighbour and thriller writer Edgar Chambers has found inspiration as lacking as the Harrington’s farm’s fertility. Perhaps ouzo in large swigs might help. Meanwhile Max fancies getting rid of Janet in favour of the delectable Suzy Stevens. Then the Ticklewell couple materialise. Mary is vaguely related to Janet; her husband George is (to put it politely) a not very efficient lawyer.

They have brought news of a legacy, but who will get the lion’s share of the million or so dollars depends on which of the two women is the closer blood kin to the deceased. This is where everything really becomes complicated, with thrills and spills generating alternate laughs and gasps from the audience.

Director Ron Aldridge keeps it all on the move with Maurice Rubens’ set, especially the stairs, almost becoming a player in its own right. Sarah Ogley, a sort of cut-price Lady Macbeth in the making, generates much of the comedy with Harry Gostelow’s lanky, much-put-upon George her perfect foil. Rikki Lawton makes Max sufficiently personable to make his relationship with both Pamela Banks’ not-just-a-dumb-blonde Janet and Amy Christina Murray’s sexy Suzy credible.

And then there’s Clive Flint as Edgar. Edgar is a type many of us will have encountered in those places where expatriates gather. An author who is never going to make the big-time but gets by on royalties and churning out another pot-boiler whenever money for booze runs short. As far as the plot of Anybody for Murder? is concerned, he’s just slightly a red herring, but a very funny one.

I won’t spoil it for you by revealing how it all works out. Find that out for yourselves.

Anybody for Murder? runs at the Summer Theatre, Southwold until 1 August and at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh between 3 and 8 August.

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