Tag Archives: Chris Keen

Singin’ in the Rain

(reviewed at the Gordon Craig Theatre, Stevenage on 18 August)

Theatrical cliché number one – the show must go on!. And go on it did for Catherine Lomax’s summer in-house production, even though Simon Anthony suffered a foot injury during a particularly energetic dance routine as Cosmo Brown, necessitating an extended interval, roughly where one would have occured in a (now old-fashioned) two-interval production.

Craig Armstrong, who had been playing the two smaller roles of Sid Philips and the diction cach, had played the part previously and took over script-in-hand for the rest of the performance. Overall it’s a lavish production, complete with rainfall for the title number and finale, which moves slickly from scene to scene (there are 21 of them).

The script follows the Betty Comden and Adolph Green screen-play with Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed’s songs, most familiar to most of us from the Gene Kelly film. Khiley Williams’ choreography has th right 1920s influences – this is a story which centres on the Hollywood change from silent to sound films – and she has deised some good production numbers as well as the iconic “singin’ in the rain”.

Central to the story is stage actress Kathy, who is invested by Katie Warsop with just the right mix of steel-backbone determination and disarming femininity. She also dances extremely well and has the voice to match. As script-writer Don Mike Denman is perhaps a better dancer and actor than he is a singer, but his engaging ersonality makes up for this.

Screech-voiced Lina, the glittering Hollywood star with a temperment to match and completely non-existent vocal charm, is brought to full theatrical life by Cameron Leigh. Lomax’s production has a clever use of film which both sets the period and reminds us of the double artificiality of the whole set-up. Chris Keen is in charge of the (unseen) orchestra and the lighting design by Pete Kramer adds to the illusion.

Singin’ in the Rain runs at the Gordon Craig Theatre, Stevenage until 27 August. There are matinée peformances on 20, 25 and 27 August.

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Filed under Music & music theatre, Reviews 2016

Sister Act

(reviewed at the Gordon Craig Theatre, Stevenage on 20 August)

Twice-yearly musicals with a broad appeal have become something of a trademark for Stevenage’s Gordon Craig Theatre’s artistic manager Catherine Lomax. This August she has chosen Sister Act, the fast-paced stage musical based on the film of the same name.

it’s star is indubitably Michelle Chantelle Hopewell who plays Deloris, so badly entangled with the gangland club owner Curtis (Trevor A Toussaint) that her former classmate, would-be suitor and police officer Eddie (Darren Charles) needs to tuck her away in a convent to save her life.

Curtis may have pooh-poohed her musical talents, but the Mother Superior (Pippa Winslow) finds herself letting them take hold on her less than perfect choir of nuns. To say that Deloris spices up the plainchant is an understatement – and she sets quite a number of cats loose amid the habited pigeons while she’s about it.

Jade Davies plays the postulant Mary Robert, a young woman suddenly unsure of her true vocation. That Mgr O’Hara (Arthur Bostrom) is all set to sell the nuns’ church for secular development simply adds to Mother Superior’s woes. Both Winslow and Roberts have strong voices and personalities which make their individual dilemmas credible in secular terms.

The costumes – no designer is credited – look good, especially the show-girl feathers and sequins and the white and silver glitter of the nuns as they perform for the Pope in the final scene. The settings, whether in the club, the police station, the church or within the convent, are clever and hold up the action as little as possible.

In the pit, musical director Chris Keen has a 12-piece ensemble. The slick choreography is by Khiley Williams. But, above all, it’s Hopewell’s evening, dominating from her first appearance – an untidy blend of naïveté and stroppiness – through her attempts to accommodate herself to being where and what she doesn’t want to be through to her final recognition not just of her own but of other people’s self-worth.

Sister Act runs at the Gordon Craig Theatre, Stevenage until 29 August.

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Filed under Musicals, Reviews 2015