Tag Archives: Cara Chase

Rope

reviewed at the Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch on 17 February

Pride goes before a fall. Arrogance can lead to the long drop. This new production by Douglas Rintoul of Patrick Hamilton’s classic suspense drama Rope makes that very clear.

Mark Dymock’s lighting combines with the sense right from the opening sequence of the events onstage being played out in real-time combine to create an unnerving atmosphere. There are laughs generated by witty, almost akin to Wilde, dialogue as well as by some of the characterisations.

But we are never left in doubt that Bandon’s charm is precariously draped over a ruthless, immoral personality. George Kemp balances both aspects impeccably. His adversary is war-wounded Rupert Cadell, a man  left with a limp and a combat-induced sense of right and wrong.

Sam Jenkins-Shaw makes the man who is in many ways the author’s mouthpiece into something of an early 20th century equivalent of one of the 17th century’s Civil War Ironsides. He brings out that Cromwellian sense of justice as well as his impatience with the Bright Young Things living in and for the present.

They are personified in Fred Lancaster’s Raglan and Phoebe Sparrow’s Leila Arden. Lancaster brings out the innate decency of this apparently lightweight socialite while Sparrow’s portrait of a flapper also lets us see he good manners and helpfulness under the posturing.

Brandon’s weak link is his partner in crime. James Sutton’s Granillo is an excellent study in a weak man growing ever more desperate as the enormity of what he has been made to do increasingly weighs him down. There are also three well-contrasted cameo performances.

These come from Cara Chase as Lady Kentley, still ignorant mother of the victim, Nico Pimparé as the servant Sabot – his meticulous laying out of the supper is a joy to watch – and Janet Amsden as Mrs Debenham, Lady Kentley’s monosyllabic poor relation.

insidious throughout is Yvonne Gilbert’s soundscape with the muted telephone bell, the crackly wireless searched for dance music and the weather outside Brandon’s bachelor flat. Ruari Murchison has furnished this cleverly, from the up-to-date Art Deco sideboard and reproduction Renaissance chest to the Victorian chaise longue and chairs.

Four and a half-star rating.

Rope continues at the Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch until 3 March with matinées on 22, 24 February, 1 and 3 March. The co-production transfers to the New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich from 7 to 17 March.

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A Murder Is Announced

(reviewed at the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford on 3 November)

The Leslie Darbon stage version of Agatha Christie’ was first produced in 1977, some 20 years after the novel had been published. It’s an interesting choice for the Middle Ground Theatre Company, but Michael Lunney’s production goes it proud.

We are in the extended drawing-room of a large village house. It’s owned by Leticia Blacklock (Diane Fletcher) and is currently shared with her somewhat doddery friend Dora Bunner (Sarah Thomas) and two young cousins, Julia (Rachel Bright) and Patrick (Patrick Neyman) Simmons.

Other neighbours and friends who drop in include Miss Marple (Cara Chase, replacing an indisposed Judy Cornwell at the performance I saw), Mrs Swettenham (Julia Bevan) and her son Edmund (Dean Smith). Plunging in and out of the action is housekeeper Mitzi (Lydia Piechowiak), a political refugee with more than the usual complement of chips on her thin shoulders.

Lunney has coaxed a good sense of period manners and attitudes from his cast; there’s no sense of artificiality in the all-important exposition scenes. Tom Butcher’s Inspector Craddock and Jog Maher’s Sergeant Mellors fit seamlessly into this ambiance. As Phillipa Haymes, Alicia Ambrose-Bayly also convinces.

You probably already know the plot, which has its full measure of twists before the dénouement. Fletcher is very effective as the chatelain with so many secrets locked up behind her gracious exterior. Chase’s Miss Marple is an interesting study; her village wise woman persona taking precedence over the nosy busy-body angle so often purveyed.

A Murder Is Announced runs at the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford until 7 November.

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