Tag Archives: Bishop’s Stortford Rhodes Arts Centre

A Brave Face

reviewed at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester on 8 February

Post Traumatic Stress is a fact of both military and civilian life. The former also impinges on the latter.

Family, friends, employers and the medical profession all attempt to deal with a person whose life has been blistered by experiences they can scarcely understand and which are outside (for the most part) their personal acquaintance.

Vamos Theatre under its founder-director Rachael Savage specialises in full-mask mime. As in classic Greek theatre, the mask both hides the identity of the actor and allows each audience member to make of the character portrayed what he or she will.

Mime makes us concentrate – there are no words to distract from what we are seeing. This full-length production does have sound, created and mixed by Janie Armour and Adrian Northover. Carl Davies’ sets and costumes with Mark Parry’s projections and Russell Dean’s masks draw it all together.

The story is simple enough. Two young men Ryan (James Greaves) and Jimmy (Sean Kempton) join the Army in 2009. Ryan’s mother (Angela Laverick) and young sister Katie (Joanna Holden) see them off on this life-changing adventure.

It takes them to Afghanistan, completely alien in culture, faith and politics to th men of their platoon. Khatera (Holden) is a young village girl, with much the same teasing attitude to Ryan as his kid sister back at home.

Then something happens in the village. Something so traumatic for Ryan that he sins his life out of all control. Discharged, he can’t settle to a job, brushes his mother and sister aside and sinks so deep into depression that the pills prescribed by an overworked doctor seem to offer the simplest way out.

Does he take it? That you have to find out for yourself. It’s important to remember that, though the theme is serious, the staging has its lighter-hearted moments. Camaraderie is understandably a support mechanism.

Most evenings show us British and Allied troops coping with strange places and even stranger customs. Atrocities do occur; it’s difficult for the lay person to place these in true context.

At the curtain call, the cast take off their masks to reveal their own faces. It is a strength of Savage’s meticulously researched production that we feel we know the person behind the mask more completely than the performer when bare-faced.

Five star rating.

A Brave Face is at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester also on 9 February. The national and international tour until 30 May includes the New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich ( 23 February), the Theatre Royal Bury St Edmunds (23 April), Hertford Theatre (1 May), the Mumford Theatre, Cambridge (2 May), the Civic Theatre, Chelmsford (5 May), Stantonbury Theatre, Milton Keynes (11 May) and the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford (12 May).

Leave a Comment

Filed under Circus & physical theatre, Reviews 2018

Cleo, Camping, Emmanuelle and Dick

reviewed at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford on 10 October

The Carry On... films and the team of actors involved with most of them in the 1960s and 70s have become embedded in the British consciousness. As with all such phenomena, myth has partly obscured fact – both for the films themselves and also for the actors.

Terry Johnson’s 1998 backstage comedy about three of the core performers and one other actress treads a fine line between impersonation and impression. The cast of this new Contexture Theatre production directed by Gailie Pollock for the most part manage this tightrope admirably, both in appearance and in sound.

As Kenneth Williams, Simon Kingsley manages the vocal and body mannerisms extremely well, having the audience on his side from the moment he steps into Sid James (Ray MacAllen)’s dilapidated former camper-van dressing-room – designed by Isobel Power Smith and giving stage management problems on the opening night.

His spiky yet underlying affectionate relationship with Chelsea Fitzgerald’s Barbara Windsor is delicately handled. Fitzgerald looks right and sounds right as the East End girl who knows which of her assets is marketable, even though she also knows that these are being exploited.

Her marriage with second-string gangster Ronnie Knight gives a twist to the plot when Eddie (Doug Shepherd), a sort of all-purpose hoodlum, intervenes. MacAllan’s Sid is another well-rounded portrait of a man who knows that time may well be running out for him without all he want – professionally, emotionally and sexually – ever remaining within his grasp.

Also involved are overworked dresser Sally (Hayley Thornton) and lissome actress Imogen Hassall Emma Denly), another performer whose aspirations were forced down a career path in which appearance mattered (as it still does) more than any dramatic talent. Both make you emphasise with their characters and their problems.

Four star rating.

Cleo, Camping, Emmanuelle and Dick continues at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford until 15 October with matinées on 12, 14 and 15 October.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Plays, Reviews 2017

Educating Rita

(reviewed at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford on 7 June)

The test of a modern classic is that it is as significant for today’s audience as it was when first staged. Willy Russell’s Educating Rita was first produced in 1980 but its two characters – the drink-drowning failed poet turned red-brick university lecturer and his feisty hairdresser Open University student – seem completely contemporary.

Gailie Pollock directs this new Contexture production with a realistic set by Amanda Stekly and Tom Cliff at its Rhodes Arts Centre home base. Greg Patmore plays Frank, who really doesn’t want this extra-curricular activity wished on him by a combination of the university authorities and Julia, his increasingly disillusioned partner. He balances the infuriating and the admirable aspects of the character with great subtlety.

She may prefer to be called Rita, but her birth name was the less tempestuous Susan. Gracie Hughes bursts into Frank’s study in a whirlwind of tumbling hair and pointing fingers, prowling around his books and pictures as though determined to make this (to her) strange environment her own. She swirls Rita’s Liverpudlian gabble (which does occasionally tip into gobble) at her reluctant tutor as though it was one of the hair-colour mixes she concocts at work.

Gradually the balance of power shifts through a sequence of short scenes, the passage of time indicated by Paul Burgess’ lighting. It is only after the interval that just how far it has altered becomes truly apparent. Rita/Susan has discovered a new way of life, a fresh circle of friends and a different career path. Frank’s future will follow a different route. Parallel lines have bent to come together, then straightened to diverge once more.

Educating Rita runs at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford until 12 June with matinées on 9, 11 and 12 June.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016

The History Boys

(reviewed at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford on 16 March).

If you’re an arts complex with professional actors as well as a thriving stage school attached, then Alan Bennett’s The History Boys is an ideal choice of production. As well as the adult staff members at the fictional boys’ school in the 1960s, there are the students – as mixed a bunch as you’re likely to encounter then, now or in the 1950s on which Bennett drew from his personal experiences.

Some of us were lucky enough to be taught by charismatic as well as dedicated teachers – I know that I was, though not by anyone quite as maverick as Hector. Matthew Ward makes him into less cuddly than some other actors’ characterisations; it’s as though he is deliberately courting disaster from our first glimpse of him, motorbike-revving as though he had just materialised from another planet.

Sue Last balances this with her straight-forwrd Mrs Lintott, a no-nonsense type who teaches efficiently but without ever stirring her students’ imaginations. Then there’s Jeremy Small’s Headmaster with his sights set on Oxbridge places. It’s a portrait of a man who lacks true authority.

As Irwin, parachuted in to polish the likely university candidates, Jack Downey offers a well thought-out portrait of a driven half-failure who knows what will work in certain circumstances and eventually manages to apply these lessons to his own career. Downey is flint to Ward’s fire, which is at it should be.

Jeanne Stacey’s production has a set by Douglas Heap which, with its simple foreground of school chairs and tables, keeps the action flowing. Of the boys, Joseph Vaiana’s brash Dakin, Joe Llewely’s Posner slowly coming to terms with his homosexual instincts, Will Edden’s chirpy Timms and Daniel Boulton’s bovine Rudge stand out.

The History Boys runs at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford until 19 March.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016

Jack and the Beanstalk

(reviewed at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford on 11 December 2015)

You can trust the annual Rhodes pantomime master-minded by Phil Dale (co-script writer, co-director and surely the only bearded Dame in the business under the nom de guerre Sarah Cook to fill the wide but shallow stage and spill action across the auditorium.

It’s traditional – the Principal Boy title role is filled by Katie Miller (with a cleavage) – but also quirky with its three comics – William Eaden as Jack’s brother Silly Billy, a sort of Mickey Rooney clone, and that Laurel and Hardy duo of Wingnut (Daniel Boulton) and Spanners (Dan James).

Our villain is Baron Backhander who Duncan Rutherford plays as a particularly selfish hedge fund manager, not light years away from last year’s King Ratputin. Oh yes, and there’s a proper over-sized Giant as well (George Jack). Fairy Evangeline Rainpetal (Jeanne Stacey, who is also co-director) has to work hard on Jack’s behalf.

Georgia Collins is Jill, the object of Jack’s affections and a bright lass who has the measure of her grasping father. Central to the story is Daisy the cow (Jack and Drew Gregg step out neatly). The choreography is by Katie Barker-Dale and really shows of the young dancers. Miles Forman (sporting a fetching piano-keyed scarf) and Lee Levent are the musicians.

Act Two takes us high into the skies with the Giant’s castle veiled in mist. We meet some raucous seagulls, more or less under the control of Dr Albert Ross (Gregg, who also voices the disgruntled goose). Thanks to – or should that be n spite of? – Milky Mary’s ballooning interventions on behalf of her two sons, all of course ends as it should do.

This season’s crop of farting jokes flourishes, as do an alarming number of references to testicles. We don’t really believe that Backhander will metamorphose into Candy Man, but I always think that the test of a proper pantomime villain is that we know he is down but never quite out. Even when his nemesis is a giant-slayer.

Jack and the Beanstalk runs at the Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishop’s Stortford until 2 January.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Pantomimes & seasonal shows, Reviews 2015