Tag Archives: Barbara Horne

The Man Upstairs

reviewed at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh on 26 August

A Patrick Hamilton psychological thriller is always good value; the twists and turns of the plot – given good direction and acting – make it something more than just a couple of hours’ theatrical entertainment. The Man Upstairs doesn’t disappoint.

It’s the final new production in the 2017 Suffolk Summer Theatres season and is directed by Phil Clark who balances the interleaved tension and comedic moments well. Tori Cobb’s set evokes the 1954 setting admirably and Miri Birch’s costumes are properly in period.

Quiet, reclusive bachelor George Longford (James Morley) plans an evening with his beloved books as his sole company. His flat is part of a house owned by Sir Charles Waterbury (Michael Shaw) who has rigged up an ingenious communication system between their two living spaces.

That quiet evening is interrupted dramatically. First on the scene is Darrell Brockis as Cyrus Armstrong, a gimlet-eyed ex-commando on the warpath in connexion with his sister’s virtue (or lack of it). Then his mother (Barbara Horne) intervenes, then Cyrus’ brother Henry and finally the wronged maiden Brenda (Naomi Evans).

And that title? it’s a word-play of course, with Sir Charles as one of its facets. Both Morley and Horne are excellent, playing off each other during their long exchanges while we in the audience concentrate on evaluating their characters. Brockis does tend to dominate, but villains always have the best lines…

Four star rating.

The Man Upstairs runs at the Southwold Arts Centre until 9 September with matinées on 31 August, 5 and 9 September.

 

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2017

The Old Country

(reviewed at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh on 23 August)

Like Shakespeare, Alan Bennett has written several of what might be defined as “problem plays”. In Bennett’s case, one of the most intriguing of these is The Old Country, which I first saw in 1977, when the actual events and characters here depicted through fictional characters, were more of immediate concern that they seem in 2016.

We’re on the verandah of a small house in the depths of the country, just the sort of place to which you can imagine any senior Civil Servant wishing to retire. Hilary (James Morley) and his wife Bron (Barbara Horne) are expecting a visit from her sister Veronica (Imogen Slaughter) and her diplomat husband Duff (Michael Shaw); they haven’t seen the couple since Duff achieved his knighthood.

Hilary and Bron do have neighbours – Olga (Melissa Clements), who is somewhat mixed-up to put it at its most simple, and her husband Eric (Bob Dobson), on the face of it just a happy-go-lucky sort of chap. But where exactly is this place in the country? and why is it, its occupants and their visitors under such surveeliance?

Bennett uses the gradual relevations of both personal and national aspects to the different characters to allow for some complex discussion about motivations, treachery and patriotism, pasts to be revealed and those which so desperately need to be concealed. People, Bennett seems to insist, have flexible loyalties, fluid as changes in international situations and issues.

What Hilary wants is, in spite of the speeches which Morley delivers with great conviction, as nebulous as any other artificial construct. Shaw and Dobson make much of their revelatory encounter in the second act while Horne gives a rounded portrait of a wife who sticks by her man, but isn’t afriad to point out where he falls short of her deserts.

Veronica is a slightly spiky personality, and no-one does stylish spikiness more accurately than Slaughter. Olga is in many ways the most difficult of the characters to pin down; her past not simply permeates what and who she is now but underlies Hilary’s shockingly crude summing-up – one of those moments in the drama when you realise that sympathy can perhaps be wrongly placed. Clements epitomises the small fry as victim.

The Old Country runs at the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh until 27 August and transfers to Southwold Summer Theatre between 29 August and 10 September.

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016