Tag Archives: Ana Maria Labin

Don Giovanni

(reviewed at the Theatre Royal Norwich on 22 November)

This production for Glyndebourne’s 2016 tour uses the 1788 Vienna version of the score. That means, among other things, that Don Ottavio is shorn of “Il mio tesero” in the second act – a pity on many ways, as Anthony Gregory both sings and acts what is arguably the most frustrating part in the opera impeccably, giving a strong as well as lyrical account of “Dalla suo pace” in the first act.

What we do hear is the duet for Zerlina (Louise Alder) and the trussed-up Leporello (Brandon Cedei) just before the graceyard scene. Alder has a Marilyn Munro air of knowing innocence which serves her better as a Sweeney Todd in the making than it did at her slightly underpowered first entrance. Her Masetto is Bozidar Smiljanic who endows the part with the right aura of buccolic bullheadedness.

Ana Maria Labin’s Donna Anna carries off her complex arias superbly, investing them with great musicianship as well as the full force of Anna’s mental torment. That is true also of Magdalena Molendowska’s Donna Elvira; her own torment runs parallel to Anna’s but is subtly differentiated. Revival director Lloyd Wood and designer Paul Brown keep the contrast between the two women clear.

Their one meeting point, of course, is Don giovanni himself. This dras a bravura performance from Duncan Rock – “Finch’han dal vino” in particular fizzes along – but the sheer nastiness of the character’s attitude to women, those who cross him and his servant is underpinned by the suggestion of equal pleasure being taken in violence.

When Andrii Goniukov’s stentorian Commendatore arrives to exact his just vengeance, it is not just Brown’s decontructed set which makes Giovanni lose control. We are throughout in a vaguely pre-and post-Second World War Seville. Costumes, like most of the triangular set, are mainly grey and black; the exceptions are occasional accents of blood-red and the more pastel-clad wedding party.

At the beginning we see a baroque painting of Mary Magdalene, luxuriant tresses, swelling draperies and look of extasy at odds with the skull she clutches. Otherwise there are only tall, dark buildings fronting slightly sinister streets and surmounted by a moon which might have drifted in from a Lorca play or poem. If you are intrigued by how a production such as this is realised, then take yourself to Don Giovanni: Behind the Curtain which explores this in depth, focussing on the Act Two finale.

Don Giovanni can be seen at the Theatre Royal, Norwich on 25 November. Don Giovanni: Behind the Curtain is at the Theatre Royal on 24 November.

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Filed under Music & music theatre, Opera, Reviews 2016

Die Entführung aus dem Serail

(reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Norwich on 18 November)

Mozart’s first adult success in Vienna was also one of the highlights of this year’s Glyndebourne Festival. David McVicar’s production directed for this autumn’s Glyndebourne Tour by Ian Rutherford gives us a far more complete version of the spoken text than is usual nowadays; one effect is to bring Pasha Selim (Franck Saurel) centre stage.

SeLim is, of course, a spoken role. Saurel displays all the character facets of this complex personality, a convert to Islam as much through circumstances as through initial intention. There’s an erotic tension to his scenes with Ana Maria Labin’s marvellously sung Konstanze – she negotiates “Martern aller Arten” flawlessly – which suggests that her relationship with Tibor Szappanos will never quite resume its old pattern.

Szappanos sings Belmonte’s arias impeccably, but one cannot help feeling that he is the most nebulous character of the story. Osmin is a gift of a part for any singer who can act as well as encompass the deepest notes of the part, notably in “Solche hergelaufne Laffen”, and Clive Bayley does it superbly. Rebecca Nelsen’s Blonde is a servant-girl with attitude and a way with kitchen paraphenalia (fresh eggs included) which wouldn’t disgrace any pantomime slop-scene.

Her Pedrillo is James Kryshak offering a lilting “In Mohrrenland” in the foiled abduction scene and holding his own in the frught exchanges with Osmin. Vicki Mortimer’s set glides effortlessly through a deft arrangement of lattice-screens; Selim’s harem is populated by an interesting selection of women, all under the watchful gaze of Daniel Vernan’s overseer. The conductor is Christoph Altstaedt.

“Die Entführung aus dem Serail” is also at the Theatre Royal, Norwich on 21 November.

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Filed under Opera, Reviews 2015