Strangers on a Train

reviewed at the Cambridge Arts Theatre on 26 February

It’s deservedly a classic of its genre. Craig Warner’s stage adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s first crime novel is literate and dramatically at ease in its multitudinous settings. Director Anthony Banks and designers David Woodhead (sets and costumes) and Duncan McLean (video and projections) have done it proud.

That also goes for the performances, led by Chris Harper as Charles Bruno and Jack Ashton as Guy Haines. Harper has the flamboyant measure of the footloose ne’er-do-well with an over-indulgent mother (the excellent Helen Anderson) and a father who keeps him on a tight financial rein.

Ashton as the visionary architect attempting to shed an unfaithful wife in favour of marriage to Anne Faulkner (Hannah Tointon) paces the moral disintegration of a man likely to lose career and marital happiness through one moment of weakness impeccably.

The tension builds as one crime begets another. Quietly knitting together the shreds of information he has painstakingly gathered is John Middleton’s Arthur Gerard, the investigator originally retained by Bruno senior and kept on by his (now) widow.

Good cameos of Haines’ colleague and the friend who offers him a chance to build his dream white bridge in Canada come from Owen Findlay and Sandy Bachelor. It’s a story without a hero – just two anti-heroes (one of whom so desperately tries to evade the rôle) – and the people swept up in their wake.

Overall, the heroes of this production are the designers’ visual ones. Stylised reality sometimes works better than a simulacrum. This is the case with this production.

Four star rating.

Strangers on a Train runs at the Cambridge Arts Theatre as part of a national tour until 3 March with matinées on 1 and 3 March.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Plays, Reviews 2018

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.