Category Archives: Ballet and dance

The Boy in the Lighthouse

reviewed at the Hostry Festival, Norwich on 24 October

Lighthouses are beacons of safety. They are positioned to warn of submerged hazards and the tumultuous seas which crash over them. Refuges – but perhaps in some ways they are also prisons.

This year’s Hostry Festival organisers, the PBSK Partnership in association with the University of East Anglia and Booja Booja, have commissioned an immersive piece of movement theatre from Total Ensemble Theatre Company and Rebecca Chapman.

With the audience on all four sides of the acting area, sounds, lighting and storm-seas colours for the simple costumes focus our concentration on the drama. The title character, played by Hugh Darrah,  is a solitary teenager, who cannot remember a time when the lighthouse was not his restricting shelter.

On the disused pier which abuts it a solitary semi-automaton fortune-teller (Aamer Raza) also seeks identity answers. As does an old mariner (Peter Barrow) nursing the remains of his pet crow (Lexi Watson-Samuels). But the sea is cruel, and its currents do not always follow human intentions.

The boy’s quest leads him to hot, war-torn countries where answers need to be pieced out of fragments. The fortune-teller also will gain the knowledge – and the peace – which he craves. It is very suitable that the myths of the sea and the distant lands to which it leads are here drawn from many cultures.

Four star rating

The Boy in the Lighthouse runs at the Hostry, Norwich Cathedral until 27 October.

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Filed under Ballet and dance, Circus & physical theatre, Reviews 2018

Beauty and the Beast

reviewed at the Rhodes Arts Complex on 22 October

Ballet Theatre UK has developed an important niche – bringing classical ballet with fresh choreographic and production values to smaller venues. These are not cut-down versions of the repertoire classics but full-scale dance-dramas in their own right.

Take the latest production, Christopher Moore’s Beauty and the Beast. It’s a familiar story which we know best in its 18th century French origin or through Christmas pantomimes. As with so many well-love “fairy tales”, it also echoes classical myths.

Costume designers Daniel Hope and Val Plant use a Fragonard-derived palette for Beauty and her greedy sisters, while the Beast, the Enchantress and their entourages are burnished in bronze and gold. Martyn Plant’s set is simple – screens consisting of rose-entwined coils of  silver, like the decoration of a Book of Hours.

A chair or a chest are the sole items of furniture and do not distract from the dancing. Moore’s choreography gives his cast opportunities to shine. The dancers respond with neat, precise footwork and jumps as well as the discipline needed to create floor patterns – not that easy to maintain given the variety of venue stages.

Some of the lifts in the performance which I saw looked awkward, and not every tour en l’air finished as cleanly as intended. The story allows for dance-classic and realistic mime with the Enchantress (Ana Caroline Feerer) every bit as imperious as Giselle‘s Myrtha and the Father allocated a pas de seul as well as acting and ensemble opportunities.

As the heroine, Erin Flaherty displays a good technique and conveys the range of emotions demanded by this principled girl, from her hero-worship of and dependence on her Father through her acceptance of the responsibilities forced on her through the theft of the Beast’s rose.

Ben Crossley Pritchard makes the Beast into a truly tormented soul, with his dual royal and animal instincts constantly warring within him. He is a supportive partner with a flair for solo scenes. The pre-recorded choice of music, drawn largely from Dvořák’s suites, fits the story admirably.

This year (2018) Ballet Theatre UK is celebrating ten years of performance. Its young dancers continue to show commitment and a sense of style. They are also cultivating the art of drawing audience’s into the world of classical ballet, with the display never outweighing the art.

Four star rating

Beauty and the Beast tours nationally until 10 February 2019, including the Grove Theatre, Dunstable (28 October), the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds (19-21 November, the Towngate Theatre, Basildon (13 January) and the Broadway Theatre, Peterborough (2 February).

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Filed under Ballet and dance, Reviews 2018

Cinderella

reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Norwich on 27 February

The essence of a fairy-tale is that it has neither time nor roots to ground it. So Matthew Bourne’s riff on Cinderella takes place not n 16th century Germany, nor early 18th century France, nor even the early 19th century of Rossini’s opera but London during the Blitz.

Bourne and Etta Murfitt keep the basic elements of the story – the daughter turned into a drudge by her father’s second wife and her children, the intervention of a quasi-supernatural force to bring her to the man who will marry her – but translates the family and the price into characters we recognise from the classic iconic films dealing with the Second World War.

Prokofiev’s score has been prerecorded and transformed into surround sound (Paul Groothuis and Brett Morris) as at the cinema. The colour palette used by Lez Brotherston (set and costumes) and by Neil Austin (lighting) and Duncan McLean (projections) is predominantly monochrome.

The cast I saw is led by Ashley Shaw as Cinderella, Liam Mower as the silver-clad Angel who guards and guides her – and will go on once the happy ending is achieved to work magic for another disconsolate soul – and Dominic North as the wounded pilot Harry.

Fine characterisations also come from Dan Wright as the foot-fetish stepbrother and Mark Samaras as his youngest brother. Madelaine Brennan’s Stepmother, drink- and man-obsessed with a protective attitude to her own brood that leads her down increasingly nasty paths, is equally eye-riveting.

Shaw, both as the drudge and the beautiful young woman has the measure of the turns and lifts Bourne gives her which echo the angularities of the score. it is a cast which acts as well as dances, well demonstrated by North, Brennan and Mower. 70-odd years ago is for most of us an era vanished into smoke. But what else is a fairy-tale, even an adult one?

Four and a half-star rating.

Cinderella continues at the Theatre Royal, Norwich until 3 March with matinées on 1 and 3 March.

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Filed under Ballet and dance, Reviews 2018