Tag Archives: Leonie Spilsbury

The Importance of Being Earnest
reviewed Ipswich 24 March

Red Rose Chain’s spring production is a new one by artistic director Joanna Carrick of Oscar Wilde’s best-known comedy. Carrick has provided a framing induction(?) which involves the 1960s descendants of Wilde’s 1890s characters clearing out the old family country home – now too big and too expensive to maintain. Quite frankly, this adds nothing but an extra gloss of artificiality to the play proper, but I suppose such things are in fashion.

This is a theatre-in-the-round staging, which place a special load on the actors, especially when they’re required to engage directly with the audience. The design eam – Carrick, David Newborn, Jack Heydon and Leo George – circulate the prologue, the main play and the epilogue – around a couple of packing-cases, a chaise longue, a tea-trolley and a tin-toned upright piano.

Joanna Sawyer is the musical director and choreographer, and she keeps her cast on the move, notably in the case of Lawrence Russell’s whirlwind Jack (he also plays Chasuble and Frank in the framing scenes). Laurence Pears contrasts lankily as Algernon and a simpering Miss Prism. The men’s quick changes of costume, especially in scenes where both the characters they play are on-stage simultaneously, is a delight to watch.

Of the women, we first meet Sawyer as Frnk’s trendy fiancée, all Carnaby Street mini-skirt and high-boots – not to mention wielding an oversize demonstration banner with theories to match. Her Cecily has a similar sparkle, manipulating her young-girl flounced skirt to devasting effect as far as Algy is concerned. Leonie Spilsbury is the slightly repressed Eloise and the confident débutante Gwendolyn; one has a horrid feeling that she might indeed end up as her mother’s true daughter.

Butlers Merriman (a misnomer if ever there was one) and Lane are doubled by Antony Carrick. At the end, Lane’s nostalgia has something of the dying fall impact of Firs from The Cherry Orchard. Joanna Carrick’s Lady Bracknell tries too hard to make us “get the point”; by this stage in his career, Wilde knew precisely how to let a line work with its hearers, without over-pointing by the actor. Those bare arms for a society matron in daytime clothes also jar.

Three and a half-star rating.

The Importance of Being Earnest continues at the Avenue Theatre, Ipswich until 9 April.

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2017

Beauty and the Beast

(reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds on 11 December)

It’s proving to be the most popular pantomime story this Christmas. Chris Hannon has come up with yet another version of the Beauty and the Beast story for Karen Simpson’s production. We’re vaguely in the Middle Ges where the villagers are torn between half-believing the stories about a beast terrorising the old abbey gardens and working out how to exploit this as a tourist attraction.

Belle (Louise Olley) has been selected (though of course she doesn’t know it yet) by green-fingered, pink-wellie-booted Fairy Blossom (Leonie Spilsbury) to undo the curse laid on a too-selfishly preening Lord Leopold (Sebastian Hill) by the evil Elvira (Britt Lenting). All three have good voices, as does Hill, when he gets the chance.

Designs are by rebecca Lee with a fine sequence of sets and a very good costume for the beast; the mask is particularly effective. The young chorus sing and dance to fill the stage thoroughly professionally. Belle is no meek girl in Olley’s characterisation; she needs to be strong because her father is a has-been touring actor Sir Kenneth Branflakes (Martin Neely) and cake-shop proprietor Molly Muffintop (Eamonn Fleming) has her own agenda.

Fleming is a Dame very much of the no-nonsense school; he works well off the audience as does Michael Lapham as dopey Barney Muffintop. Lenting commands the stage in her numbers; musical director Ward Baker makes good use of the choice of favourite – but always appropriate to the situation numbers. Julia Cave’s choreograpy and Jake Taylor’s lighting add to the fairy-tale atmosphere. There’s good use of amplified sound at atrategic moments by Andy Hinton.

Beauty and the Beast runs at the Theatre Royal, Bury st Edmunds until 15 January. Check the theatre’s website (theatreroyal.org) for performance times.

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Filed under Pantomimes & other seasonal shows, Reviews 2016

Jack and the Beanstalk

(reviewed at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds on 6 December 2015)

This year’s Theatre Royal pantomime may have a traditional story but writer Chris Hannon, director Karen Simpson and designer Rebecca Lee have given it some intriguing twists. The action is set in the 1970s, when men’s trousers were flared, girls wore miniskirts and hippy flower-power dominated. So Wendy (Leonie Spilsbury), our magical guide, is flower-wreathed and maxi-gowned.

Jack is Oliver Mawdsley, shyly in love with hot-panted Jill (Louise Olley), the daughter of Elvis-clone Duke Box; Chris Clarkson sports an enormous quiff and a glittering white outfit. Demanding money with menaces (children taken for baking in lieu) is Ghastly Gordon. Alan Mehdizadeh is certainly a chef you wouldn’t want anywhere near your own kitchen.

Under his ladle and rolling-pin is Sue Chef (Nancy Hill), who doesn’t really want to be as nasty as her boss would like. But Duke Box has no spare cash and Tina Trumpington (James Parkes), Jack’s mother, has even less. Cue the sale of Daisy the cow, a bovine with a satin-udder who captures the audience heart with her first hoof step.

Act Two sees our hero confronting David Zachary’s Giant, a marvellous contraption of swollen belly, long long arms and legs and a ridiculously small head crowned with a minute top hat. This is where we meet Dottee (Spilsbury), the Giant’s seen-it-all-before wife. Kung fu expert Jill is a better match for Gordon than Jack, let alone the other space-travelling mortals.

I failed to warm to Parkes’ Dame, a somewhat rough characterisation, though the flour scene in the Trumpington windmill is a good variant of the traditional slop scene; this windmill boasts an engaging puppet mouse, and I think the youngsters in the audience would have liked to see more of him. The rock’n’roll dance numbers (Julia Cave is the choreographer) are fast-paced and both the Act One Elvis “Megamix” and the Act Two “Cooking up the bits” (a variation on “Puttin’ on the Ritz” are stand-outs.

Jack and the Beanstalk runs at the Bury St Edmunds Theatre Royal until 10 January.

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Filed under Pantomimes & seasonal shows, Reviews 2015