Tag Archives: Eastern Angles

The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart
reviewed 23 March

Folk traditions – especially verse, dance and music – can sometimes seem like a fly caught in amber, museum pieces rather than something alive and evolving. That’s the argument at the heart of David Greig’s Borders-set musical play currently being toured to arts and community centres in East Anglia. There are pefomances in more conventional theatre settings – such as the Quay Theatre in Sudbury (where I saw it) – but Hal Chambers’ production really needs a more informal, in-the-round ambiance.

A cast of four, all of whom sing and play a variety of instruments very well, take all the parts. Prudencia herself (Hannah Howie) is a somewhat up-tight academic concerned to keep Border minstrelsy in its historical place; Walter Scott is her guide for this and in fact a great deal of the dialogue is couched in his metrical narrative rhythmns. Her opposite in attitude is Colin (Robin Hemmings) with his laid-back personality and modernising mission.

Then there’s Nick (Simon Donaldson). Yes, you guessed right – He’s more than just a collector of old books and rare artefacts. Haunting the transition between this world and something more winter-solstice sinister is Elspeth Turner, whose child-puppet sequence is truly eerie. Chambers is a puppet specialist, and it shows superbly here.

Eastern Angles is to congratulated on looking outside its home territory for some of its productions. However, not everything works out of its original territory (Holy Mackerel! a year or so ago is one instance). I found much of the accented dialogue difficult to follow; again, this may partly be due to the venue. Designer Bek Palmer aided by musical director and puppeteer Arran Glass conjure up lecture halls, snow-dredged exteriors, sessions in wayside pubs and book-lined libraries as though by magic.

Three and a half-star rating.

The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart tours until 27 May.

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Filed under Music Music theatre & Opera, Reviews 2017

Stoat Hall

(reviewed at the SirJohn Mills Theatre, Ipswich on 9 December)

Eastern Angles’ Christmas show is a Pat Whymark and Julian Harries confection, which means that it’s literate, tuneful and lethally clever – at times a little too much so for its own good. There’s a lot of cod as well as real Shakespeare and a whole series of riffs to do with Richard III and Henry VIII, not to mention tranches of East Anglian as well as national history, legend, might-have-beens and architecture.

That all means that I thoroughly enjoyed Stoat Hall, but perhaps partly because it tweaked some of my own interests. There’s an extremely hard-working cast of five, switching stage gender as adroitly as role, costume and set accessories. At the centre of the imbroglio is poor Sir Roger (Richard Mainwaring) who has the misfortune to have close blood ties to both the last Plantagent and the second Tudor kings.

Not to mention a crone of a grand-mother Agnes (Violet Patton-Ryder), a wilful wife and a daughter who takes after her (Geri Allen in both roles), a love-sick jester Perch (Matt Jopling) and a sinister in-house alchemist John Dee (Patrick Neyman, who also plays the second, stroppily butch daughter Hedwig). When Henry arrives on a wife-hunting mission, things start going even more wrong.

The music is suitably 16th century pastiche; the cast provide the instrumental accompaniments. Designer Richard Evans works his own particular magic with a very small acting area, ornamented by a whole series of pop-up and pop-out puppets. Not to mention an interesting variation on an autopsy. Don’t worry, no animals (two- or four-legged) were hurt during the procedure.

Stoat Hall runs at the Sir John Mills Theatre, Ipswich until 7 January. It then plays at the Seckford Theatre, Woodbridge between 10 and 21 January and at the Key Theatre Studio, Peterborough from 24 to 28 January. Check the theatre’s website (easternangles.co.uk) for performance times.

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Filed under Pantomimes & other seasonal shows, Reviews 2016

The Fletton Railway Children

(reviewed at The Undercroft, Peterborough on 28 October)

Julie Mayhew has updated the classic E Nesbit adventure story The Railway Children from the early 20th century and Yorkshire to the Swinging Sixties and Cambridgeshire. Bobbie, Phyllis and Peter have acquired a stroppy teenage older sister, Cheryl, and the family’s enforced move is from Petersham to Peterborough.

If pre-First World War spy mania was a feature of the Edwardian period, then the 1960s saw a resurgence fuelled by the Profumo affair and the Burgess and Maclean scandal. Each of the siblings has to adjust in their different ways to the change in circumstances with their mother shielding them from any knowledge of what actually has happened to her husband and their father.

Poppy Rowley keeps the action moving with all four of her actors playing several parts as well as those of Bobbie (Lianne Harvey), Cheryl (Lily Howkins), Phyllis (Charlotte Ellen) and Peter (Lewys Taylor). Fashion-wise Howkins as Cheryl makes a good foil to Harvey’s older in understanding than in years Bobbie and Ellen’s ‘tween ages Phyllis. Taylor’s all-boy Peter is also a person in whom one can believe.

The set designed by Fiona Rigler is simple – two wooden frameworks which pivot as indoor locations change to outdoor ones. Her costumes, notably Cheryl’s booby-sox and white mini-dress and Bobbie’s Rive Gauche outfit of black jumper and leggings – very Juliette Greco – add their own dimension to the girls’ characterisation. A simple straw hat indicates their mother as they alternate in taking on the part.

You can’t quite describe this Eastern Angles production as site-specific; like any good story it has a chameleon quality. A local audience will pick up on places and areas which may be just names to outsiers. But anyone who lives in East Anglia is still experiencing the effects of Dr Beeching’s axe-swing across the region’s rail network. Plus ça change…

The Fletton Railway Children runs at The Undercroft, Serpentine Green Shopping Centre until 5 November.

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016

We Didn’t Mean To Go To Sea

(reviewed at the Hugh House, Bentwater on 24 June)

Ivan Cutting has revamped his production of some two or three years ago for this new outing of Nick Wood’s stage adaptation of the Arthur Ransome story. The former jet-engine testing facility at the disused (or rather, re-used) RAF Bentwater airfield is a favourite Eastern Angles venue, though designer Rosie Alabaster has chosen to use only a fraction of the cavernous space.

The cast of four – Rosalind Steele as Susan (the eldest of the siblings), Joel Sams as her older brother John, Matilda Howe as family baby Titty and Christopher Buckley as th in-between brother Roger – also play respectively the naval officer father, his wife and the children’s mother, the Dutch pilot and Jim, whose uncle’s boat is the terrain for the adventure.

A partly realistic boat deck with its galley and bunk-bed accommodation is the main element of Alabaster’s set. Paschal McGuire’s animations on stretched white sails at either end of the acting area (they also box in the audience) suggest the turbulence and congestion of the North Sea once the four find themselves offshore. Stuart Brindle’s sound design incorporates a hint of Shostakovitch (top marks for not using Britten’s Peter Grimes‘ sea interludes) as well as the sounds of the sea.

Because the cast play it with utter conviction, they catch the audience’s imagination and make it work in tune with their own mime and gestures. Imagination is a far more effective painter than fake realism in many theatrical instances as Cutting’s production proves. You don’t need to be a sailor yourself to understand the pleasures as well as the pains of messing about in boats. I suspect that we shall see this production again.

We Didn’t Mean To Go To Sea runs as the Hush House, Bentwater until 9 July with matinées on 25, 26 and 29 June, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 9 July. It then transfers to Neme Park, Peterborough between 13 and 17 July.

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016

Somewhere in England

(reviewed at the Brentwood Theatre on 1 April)

Polly Wiseman’s new play for Eastern Angles – Somewhere in England is touring as the company’s contribution to the Eighth in the East project – takes two GIs and two girls living in rural Suffolk to weave a story of four clashes of cultures. Joe (Nathanael Campbell) is Black and a qualified engineer, though the American Air Force sees him only as useful labour at the base.

Chester (Joshua Hayes) is a White airman, who would actually prefer to be grounded; he thinks his friendly condescension towards Joe and Londoner Land girl Viv (Georgia Brown) mrks him out as someone superior. Viv has become something of a role model, though not always in the best way, by schoolgirl Ginny (Grace Osborn).

In some ways the plot follows an obvious course, though the characterisation of the main characters (Brown, Hayes and Osborn also take on other roles) is sufficiently sharp and in-depth to disguise any predictabilities. Gai Jones directs with a simple design by Ryan Dawson Laight and costumes which allow for quick changes on and off stage.

Campbell gives a nuanced performance as a man who knows that he world is skewed to be unjust, is prepared to contest this but knows where the limit are likely to be well into his old age – if he survives that long. You can’t really warm to – let alone like – Chester and Hayes wisely doesn’t attempt to gloss the man’s brash self-regard. Viv is a girl doing her bit for the war effort, but also feeling disorientated; this Brown conveys clearly.

Osborn’s Ginny develops into a fascinating character, a 15-year old with emotions beyond her age, caught between girlish gawkiness and a burgeoning maturity with which she is, as yet, unable to cope. It’s a stage most women will probably recognise from their own teenage. Tom Fox’s sound-scape puts us in the historical period punctuated by reminders that war is not a game.

Somewhere in England is on tour to 4 June including performances at the Sir John Mills Theatre, Ipswich (25-30 April), the Haverhill Arts Centre (10 May), the Luton Hat Factory (17 May), Sheringham’s Little Theatre (25 May), the Cramphorn Theatre, Chelmsford (26 May) and The Cut, Halesworth (31 May).

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Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016