Tag Archives: Brigid Larmour

I Capture the Castle
reviewed in Watford on 5 April

Novelists present us with persons, places and situations which our imaginations decorate at our individual pleasures. Dramatists do much of that work for us, and composers of music theatre further colour our attitudes to the story presented. It’s all even trickier when it comes to a favourite book first read when one was a very young adult.

So writer Teresa Howard and composer Stephen Edis have given themselves a problem with Dodie Smith’s I Capture the Castle. I don’t think they’ve solved it. The score is pleasant enough with its touches of Weill and popular 1930s composers, but it’s not one to send you out of the theatre with its tunes lodged firmly in your head. The successive repeats of Cassandra’s opening number act merely as punctuation points.

Both the best musical sequences occur in the second half. One is “Only men” in which New York socialite Mrs Cotton (Julia St John) and her photographer sister Leda (Shona White) make their attitude to the other sex clear. The other is the solo, morphing into a duet, for James Mortmain (Ben Watson) and his second wife Topaz (Suzanne Ahmet) in which his writer’s block and need for a muse are shown to be uncomfortably entwined.

Brigid Larmour’s direction keeps the action mainly in the delapidated castle rented by the Mortmains with seaside excursions to Southwold and culminating in a trip to London’s West End. Shona Morris is the movement director making full use of Ti Green’s precipitous set of staircases and towers. Neil, the wealthy American who now owns the castle, and his brother Simon are particularly well characterised by Luke Dale and Theo Boyce respectively.

As Cassandra (Lowri Izzard)’s older sister Rose, Kate Batter has the more difficult – because less sympathetic – role. Isaac Stanmore as Stephen, the shy boy-of-all-trades who finds himself an artist’s model en route to a Hollywood career, makes his calf-love sncere. But the star of the evening is undoubtedly Izzard as the teenage diarist who records the sheer daftness of her family and will so obviously become a far better writer than her one-novel father.

Three star rating.

I Capture the Castle runs at the Palace Theatre, Watford until 22 April with matinées on 6, 8, 11, 13, 15, 18, 20 and 22 April. It is a co-production with the Octagon Theatre, Bolton to which it transfers between 26 April and 6 May.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Music & music theatre, Reviews 2017

Arms and the Man

(reviewed at the Palace Theatre, Watford on 7 October)

Like director Brigid Larmour, this is a Shavian comedy which seems not to have been in my theatre-going orbit for decades. For all that it seems to have drifted out of fashion, it’s a play well worth reviving, and Larmour does it proud with a cast that knows what it’s about and intriguing, somewhat minimalist sets by Rebecca Brower. It’s briskly paced, but the activity is never cumbersome.

Hannah Morrish’s Raina sets the tone from the opening scene with her mother Catherine (Kathryn O’Reilly) and Jill McAusland’s pert maid Louka. Enter the fugitive Captain Bluntschli, to whom Pete Ashmore gives a dash of derring-do as well as Swiss pragmatism. He and Morrish play beautifully off each other throughout. Raina, of course, thinks she is in love with the dashing cavalry officer Sergius (Assad Zaman).

This is another well thought-out performance, edging dangerously towards the over-blown but always reined in short of it. Walter van Dyk’s Major Peckoff is just the sort of patriarch that his womenfolk manipulate with ease. McAusland deepens her own characterisation in her exchanges with David Webber’s Nicola; this authoritative Black actor adds an interesting dimension to his creed of how to survive as a servant.

Music and sound is by Arun Ghosh, never obstrusive but nderpinning the setting of one of that sequence of Balkan conflicts which peppered the late 19th century. It all ends, as in a Shakespeare comedy, with a dance choreographed by Jack Murphy. The audience just has to sit back, look and listen. And enjoy the experience.

Arms and the Man runs at the Palace Theatre, Watford until 22 October with matinées on 8, 12, 15, 20 and 22 October.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Plays, Reviews 2016

Dick Whittington

(reviewed at the Palace Theatre, Watford on 11 December 2015)

Andrew Pollard is the author of this year’s home-grown pantomime at the Palace Theatre, Watford. In one sense, this Dick Whittington is a pared-down production with a total cast of seven and a three-piece led by musical director Andy Ralls band perched high above Cleo Pettitt’s bright sets. But that doesn’t mean that we feel in the least bit short-changed.

Our hero is played by Joseph Prwen, escaping from Watford (where else?) and his domineering mum (Terence Frisch as Mrs Whittington) in search of fame and the fortune suggested by the myth of London’s gold-paved streets. London has been taken over by rats as the drop curtain makes clear. You can pick out Currant Cakey’s Globe Theatre, the down-river HP Sauce Bridge and the new National Rail Planning HQ (formerly the Tower of London).

Dick encounters a stray Tabby Cat, to whose feline features Aveta Chen’s delicate oriental face is admirably adapted. Her gestures are in keeping as she mimes, dances and rat-catches her way into Alderman Fitzwarren (Walter van Dyk)’s cheese emporium. Dick has by this time fallen head over heels with free-spending Alice Fitzwarren (Jill McAusland). No wonder Fitzwarren is running out of money as well as stock.

You don’t want to meddle with Erica Guyett’s Queen Rat. A thoroughly piratical person for whom apparently Fairy Bowbells (Arabella Rodrigo) is no match. One thing which this type of pantomime allows is a deeper development of each character than is often the case, and director Brigid Larmour allows proper space for this. So Dick changes gradually from someone to whom things happen to a person who solves problems.

Frisch plays one of those no-nonsense types of Dame, from the first lollipop lady entrance onwards. There’s more to van Dyk’s alderman and his relationship with the daughter he loves but who also irritates him than we are usually allowed to fathom. Not that the traditional gags are missing; the ghost scene involves a white rabbit (Welsh rarebit) and the song-sheet is, most appropriately, “Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner”. The silver and salmon costumes for the walk-down look gorgeous.

Dick Whittington runs at the Palace Theatre, Watford until 2 January.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Pantomimes & seasonal shows, Reviews 2015

Coming Up

(reviewed at the Palace Theatre, Watford on 14 October)

I remember Neil D’Souza’s first play A Small Miracle from its Colchester production a few years ago. it was a quirky exploration of pilgrimage, longing and just a couple of things which cannot easily be explained away by rationality. Coming Up also deals with longings, journeys both mental and physical and quite a few inexplicable things. The title refers to an India catch-phrase signifying social mobility and the ladder of success. Ladders, as everyone who has ever played a board game knows, also have snakes.

We are in India, a time-shift country in more senses than one. The action takes place partly in present-day Mumbai, now a thriving economic hot-spot – at least, if you’re on the top of the go-getting heap. We are also, frequently at the same time, in rural Mangalore between 1938 and 1943 as well as in a narrative time limbo. Director Brigid Larmour, movement director Shona Morris and designer Rebecca Brower have eschewed naturalism for a fluidity which is neither wholly Indian nor completely Western.

D”Souza plays Alan Lobo, a middle-aged British Asian now successful in business, and ruthless with it. He’s in Mumbai to see if shifting his enterprise to the Philippines will be worthwhile; it’s all down to the bottom line. He has also taken the opportunity to visit his aunt Alice (Goldy Notay) and renew his boyhood friendship with her son Daniel (Mitesh Soni). The names tell you that this is a Christian family.

Clambering to the top in business often has to be a ruthless, single-minded affair. Alan’s casualties include his estranged father Jacob (Ravin J Ganatra as the older man, Notay as a boy), Alan’s wife Anya and his call-centre manager – and occasional mistress – Hanna (Clara Indrani). Christian India may have said that it ignored the caste system, but the Lobo family’s status as mere farm labourers automatically relegate him to the bottom of the heap, even as an altar boy scrubbing latrines rather than attending class.

The two priests of Pezar parish are the authoritarian, not to say sadistic and libidinous, Fr Mendoza (Ganatra) and the twoo-soft-for-his-own-good Fr Alvares (Soni). Ganatra takes on the part of Ghalib, Alan’s Mumbai driver. Indrani additionally plays teacher Mrs Pereira, the thoroughly unpleasant cook who torments young Jacob and a sinuous man-eating tiger who prowls through both his dreams and his reality.

It may all sound incredibly complicated, but this style of staging allows the action to flow and the changes in location to evolve without physical scene changes. A sari, androgynous shirts and loose trousers switch Indrani and Notay effortlessly between rôles and sexes; a crucifix or stole marks the priest from the layman. The acting is uniformly good and Arun Ghosh’s soundscape makes fine use of the Schubert “Ave Maria”.

Coming Up continues at the Palace Theatre, Watford until 24 October.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Plays, Reviews 2015